15 Nov

Tony Clayden receives Good Music Certificate from Evergreen Magazine

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Evergreen Magazine has just awarded its Good Music Certificate to the Co-Ordinator of the London Light Music Meetings Group, Tony Clayden.

The first joint recipients of this honour were the late David Ades and Alan Bunting, who did so much to keep Light Music alive.

Sadly, both men died relatively soon afterwards, and Alan’s family were left with a huge collection of recorded material, including CDs and on vinyl.

Alan had painstakingly digitally remastered much of the latter over a number of years for reissue on several different labels, including the highly–acclaimed Guild series.

Not only did Londoner Tony ‘gallop to the rescue’ by purchasing and retrieving them all from Alan’s home in Scotland, but he had already established the LLMMG – which had come into being after the Robert Farnon Society, led for many years by David Ades – ceased operations at the end of 2013.

The new group, which holds meetings twice-yearly in Central London, has recently held its eighth event. With its links to a number of other music websites and organisations, including the Light Music Society, it continues to promote the genre and helps to avoid the potential disappearance of probably thousands of once–familiar tunes.

A semi-retired recording and sound engineer, Tony is one of a small band of dedicated enthusiasts who recognise the value and worth of Light Music and he has amassed many musical contacts and friends during a long, interesting and varied career.

Tony, we thank you for filling a huge musical void and wish you well, as you continue to make historic and tuneful melodies available to the general public.

Angeline Wilcox, Editor
EVERGREEN MAGAZINE
WINTER EDITION
NOVEMBER 2017

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08 Nov

Silver Voice: Opera Arias Played by Flute and Orchestra

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By Peter Burt
Katherine Bryan; Orchestra of Opera North / Bramwell Tovey
Chandos 5211 (65:07)

Katherine Bryan was educated at Chetham's School of Music in Manchester and became principal flute of the Royal Scottish National Orchestra in 2003, a position to which she was appointed at the age of 21.

Read the review here...

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06 Nov

Cornish Rhapsody

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(Hubert Bath)
Analysed by Robert Walton

In the 1940s there was an outpouring of potted pieces for piano and orchestra written specifically for British films. These include The Dream of Olwen (Charles Williams) from “While I Live”, The Legend of the Glass Mountain (Nino Rota) from “The Glass Mountain” and just for a change the real Rachmaninov for “Brief Encounter” borrowed from the Second Piano Concerto. It was Steve Race who cleverly coined the phrase “the Denham Concertos” after the film studio that often featured such works on their soundtracks.

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(Hubert Bath)
Analysed by Robert Walton

In the 1940s there was an outpouring of potted pieces for piano and orchestra written specifically for British films. These include The Dream of Olwen (Charles Williams) from “While I Live”, The Legend of the Glass Mountain (Nino Rota) from “The Glass Mountain” and just for a change the real Rachmaninov for “Brief Encounter” borrowed from the Second Piano Concerto. It was Steve Race who cleverly coined the phrase “the Denham Concertos” after the film studio that often featured such works on their soundtracks.

But there were three really outstanding Rachmaninov-inspired works for piano and orchestra, two from movie soundtracks. The most popular was Richard Addinsell’s Warsaw Concerto from the 1941 film “Dangerous Moonlight”. Then there was Clive Richardson’s independent composition London Fantasia (1945), a brilliant depiction of the Battle of Britain. The third, Hubert Bath’s Cornish Rhapsody from the film “Love Story” (1944) was another World War 2 composition that caught the public’s imagination mostly because of the music. It’s the story of a concert pianist, played by Margaret Lockwood, who learning she had an incurable illness, moved to Cornwall.

Apart from the title Cornish Rhapsody that gives away its location, two other connections with the piece have a distinct English west country association. The composer’s surname reminds you of the famous Roman city but his birthplace was actually Barnstaple in neighbouring Devon.

The London Symphony Orchestra conducted by the composer with pianist Harriet Cohen goes straight into the main tune. Then everything changes with sudden dramatic chords followed by a rippling run from Cohen who continues the theme. Back comes the orchestra until a solo violin produces a brief tender moment supported by an oboe, horn, and sustained double basses.

Now Cohen sensitively plays the melody on her own; the first time we hear it clearly. After the orchestra creeps in, she acts as decorator until a distinct break occurs. Heading for the heights, she goes into solo mode including some bird-like chirps in the treble (Messiaen would have approved). Then she gets heavy-handed working up a bit of a lather before quietly welcoming the orchestra back with some gentle highly technical pianistics. Thunderous percussion precedes the orchestra that spells out the tune in the strongest of terms. Cohen again joins up with some thrilling playing for some musical tennis, tossing the tune around with the orchestra. From there it’s all go to the end, building up to a colossal climax and giving the glorious main melody its final outing with soloist and orchestra coming together for a magnificent finale. That performance is guaranteed to make any audience applaud rapturously.

And that’s exactly the feeling I used to get each time I heard Cornish Rhapsody all those years ago. For me it was the best of the film piano and orchestra compositions probably because it was a simple tune yet at the same time so dramatic.

“The Composer Conducts” (Vol. 2)
“The Golden Age of Light Music”
Guild (GLCD 5178)

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23 Oct

Report on the Autumn Event of the London Light Music Meetings Group - October 8th 2017

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The Autumn Event of the London Light Music Meetings Group - October 8th 2017
The Autumn Event of the London Light Music Meetings Group - October 8th 2017

Tony Clayden welcomed us once again to the Lancaster Hall Hotel and opened the programme with Robert Farnon's Country Boy featuring vocalist Sheila Southern, with Bob conducting the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. This was particularly appropriate, as Sheila was with us in the audience.

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12 Oct

Flowing Stream

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(Joyce Cochrane)
Analysed by Robert Walton

For me the name Joyce Cochrane has always been synonymous with just one composition, her beautiful Honey Child immortalized in Robert Farnon’s arrangement for the Queen’s Hall Light Orchestra. So it was a nice surprise to come upon one that almost got away. Flowing Stream is included in the Golden Age of Light Music series in “A First A-Z of Light Music”. (Guild GLCD 5169).

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(Joyce Cochrane)
Analysed by Robert Walton

For me the name Joyce Cochrane has always been synonymous with just one composition, her beautiful Honey Child immortalized in Robert Farnon’s arrangement for the Queen’s Hall Light Orchestra. So it was a nice surprise to come upon one that almost got away. Flowing Stream is included in the Golden Age of Light Music series in “A First A-Z of Light Music”. (Guild GLCD 5169).

With no intoduction the opening immediately calls to mind two great light orchestral classics - Clive Richardson’s Outward Bound and Benjamin Frankel’s Carriage and Pair. But this is Flowing Stream of 1958 played by the New Century Orchestra conducted by Erich Borschel. It was used in the same year as the theme for a British Southern Television series called “Mary Britten, MD”, starring Brenda Bruce. The juxtaposition of the two tunes works remarkably well in quite a different arrangement from the originals. Flowing Stream has a lighter textured treatment with a lovely feeling of peace and calm in a troubled world guaranteed to make you smile. Pure nostalgia you might say from a vanished era. Each time the strings go into a holding pattern, flutes ripple their way over the chord.

After 16 bars we go into 8 bars of a contrasting tune perhaps suggesting a change of scenery but with more tension. Listen to a descending string bass before the main theme repeats and completes a 32 bar chorus with a definite finish. In fact it’s a double closure of the first section.

And now the bridge. Modulating to a new key, a pleasant melody played by a horn provides clear echoes of the theme with a slightly bluesy effect but quickly returns to the delightful main strain. And then the tune (more laid back) is repeated yet again in two keys before going into that earlier 8 bar passage. Finally after a gentle restart the haunting Flowing Stream gradually builds up to a truly triumphant ending. By now it has become a fast moving river!

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12 Oct

Classic FM celebrates 60 Years of the Light Music Society - on 12th October

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Classic FM is celebrating 60 Years of the Light Music Society, of which Robert Farnon was such a committed member

Thursday 12th October on Classic FM at 8.00pm Catherine Bott will present a celebration of the Light Music Society's work and the music that it preserves.

Tonight, Catherine Bott champions this important body by featuring two hours of music by composers who have had connections with the Society and helped make it grow into the organisation it is today.

http://www.classicfm.com/…/full-works-conce…/upcoming-shows/…/full-works-conce…/upcoming-shows/

Ron Goodwin
633 Squadron – Main Theme

Eric Coates
Three Elizabeths SuiteA

rthur Bliss
Things to Come – March

Cecil Armstrong Gibbs
DuskErnest Tomlinson
Suite of English Folk Dances

Albert Ketelbey
Bells Across The MeadowHaydn Wood
London Landmarks

Billy Mayerl
Marigold

Edward Elgar
Chanson de Nuit Opus 15 No.1

Gustav Holst
A Moorside Suite

Percy Grainger
Handel in the Strand

Emile Waldteufel
Les Patineurs

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29 Sep

Light Music Matters - David Mellor talk

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On Monday November 6th, the  broadcaster and vice-president of Putney Music – David Mellor – will deliver a talk entitled:

'LIGHT MUSIC MATTERS'

He will explain why the music of Eric Coates, Leroy Anderson and many others merits an audience today.

The venue is the Dryburgh Hall, Putney Leisure Centre – corner of Dryburgh Road and Upper Richmond Road, London SW15 1BL.

Admission is free to members of Putney Music, guests will be charged £8.00 on the night.

For further details, call 07900 491 470.

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21 Sep

Royal Air Force 100th Anniversary

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Various Performers
Chandos 10973(2) x

For those who love band music of the military variety this is a fine buy, as there are two albums – each of around 60 minutes duration – for about the price of one.

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About Geoff 123
Geoff Leonard was born in Bristol. He spent much of his working career in banking but became an independent record producer in the early nineties, specialising in the works of John Barry and British TV theme compilations.
He also wrote liner notes for many soundtrack albums, including those by John Barry, Roy Budd, Ron Grainer, Maurice Jarre and Johnny Harris. He co-wrote two biographies of John Barry in 1998 and 2008, and is currently working on a biography of singer, actor, producer Adam Faith.
He joined the Internet Movie Data-base (www.imdb.com) as a data-manager in 2001 and looked after biographies, composers and the music-department, amongst other tasks. He retired after nine years loyal service in order to continue writing.